Evaluation

 

Evaluation occurs when the occupational therapist compares the patient’s prior level of function to current level of function while taking into account the influence of client factors, performance skills, performance patterns, contexts, and environments. The evaluation consists of two parts: (1) occupational profile and (2) analysis of occupational performance.

 
Spinal Stenosis, 3 months Post Surgery: Jan Davis Speaks with the Family

Spinal Stenosis, 3 months Post Surgery: Jan Davis Speaks with the Family

a) Occupational profile  

Occupational profile refers to a written descriptive statement that provides readers (e.g., doctors, nurses, insurance representatives) with a holistic understanding of the patient’s unique occupational history and experiences, patterns of daily living, interests, values and needs. The occupational profile should be included within the patient’s medical record as a reminder to view the patient as a whole person rather than a disability. 

 
   Related ICE Videos
 

 
   Questions
 

Ask these questions when watching the related videos.

  1. Create an occupational profile based on a patient in one of the ICE videos. Even though you do not have all of the information about the patient, imagine what their profile could look like and how you would document this in their medical chart.

  2. Write your own occupational profile.

b) Analysis of occupational performance  

Analysis of occupational performance refers to the investigation of the client’s strengths and weaknesses as they affect the client’s ability to complete a functional task.

 
   Questions
 

Ask these questions when watching the related videos.

  1. What standardized assessments facilitate evaluation of occupational performance?

  2. What nonstandardized assessment skills facilitate evaluation of occupational performance?

  3. How does the context and environment affect outcomes?